search engine optimization

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OK gang!

This one is pretty easy first to understand which pieces need to be affected and then to do it. This problem is… most people cut themselves short and don’t ever take the time to actually put it all in place.

Now, I said that this is not hard to do and it isn’t. It just takes making sure all of your bases are covered very carefully.

On-page Mandatories

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Now, as there are 13 different factors (and actually there are more!) that need to be affected I am going to revisit this post over the next few weeks to cover each of the different factors and explain each of them.
Today,  let’s start with the first three of them:
1. Keyword In Domain Name – this one is an easy one.  If we do a search for just about any topic we shall see that often the first ranked page (or one of the first) will have the search term within it’s name.
In terms of best domain names, .com, .net and .org are the best domains. The rest are a little harder to rank for as the SE’s don’t seem to give them the same credibility (OK… we won’t get into .org and .edu sites right now as they are a different ball game).
Now, if you can’t get a domain name with your keyword directly in it then try using hyphens between the words as the next best option. You can also add a prefix or suffix to the domain name, like theseowebsite.com or seowebsitereviews.com.
If you do try one of the above please keep in mind that a name with a suffix seems to rank better than a name with a prefix added.  In short you want the target keywords to be at the front of the name.
There are many other factors that also need to come into play but if they are also in place then the site with the search term in it’s name will win out.
2. Keyword in Page Title Tag – This one is even easier than the last one.  All you need to do is have the actual target keyword (phrase) in the page title of the page.
This shows up in the tags within the pages actual code.  In short you MUST have a Title tag… period.
The tags on a web page do not hold nearly the power they did a few years ago but they are still important to hit properly.  In short we want then to be correct so the SE reads them and displays our page as we want it and taged with the terms we feel are important.
Google will read your title tag and use it to determine what your page is about. In short, the title tag is noted to have consistent positive correlation with higher website rankings.
It will  be extremely rare to find a page ranking well that does not have its keyword in it’s title tag.
3. Keyword in the URL – This is really only important in cases where you want to see internal pages ranking for specific terms.  In these cases you want the keyword in the pages name.  This works in similar fashion to the domain name itself.
Think about a blog for instance.  It will be much easier to rank for a term that is in the URL identifying the page as opposed to a year/month/day/ post number.  If you are blogging… and frankly for all sites please make sure the URL’s of each page properly identify the actual page topic.
Well that is all I am covering today.  In my next post I will go over the next 3-4 pieces of this little seo puzzle.
Onward & Upward until them my friends.
Sam Knoll
P.S. Please feel free to enter any comments you may have here as it is an important part of all of us learning together.

Filed under Blog, Free Resources, Online Marketing, SEO by  #

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Here is a brief slide show (I wanted to try out the slideshare Plugin here) detailing much of what we do when we work with a client on Search Engine Optimization, Search Engine Marketing, and Pay Per Click marketing.

There is of course some variety in what we do with each client and how much we charge for our services… but this is a great overview.

If you hover your mouse over the slide show you will see a variety of controls at the bottom.

If you want it to play automatically (10 seconds per slide) hit the play button on the far right.  If you want to move between the slides at will use the plus and minus signs at either side of the show.

Come visit us at our SEO website and set your self up for a free consultation.

Sam

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Before I get rolling on this I feel I need to make an important distinction:

When attempting to affect the position in which a given page shows in the Search Engine Results there are generally two lines of work that are performed.

First we have SEO or Search Engine Optimization.  This is the work that is done ON a website (which in the Search Engines’ eyes is actually a collection of interlinked individual pages) to help guide the engines to associating pages with the topics we want them to.  This also includes designing pages so they are Search Engine friendly meaning it is as easy as possible for the Search Engines to move through a page and rapidly determine its focus.  This also includes a well designed linking strategy within a site’s pages to maximize and control the flow of page rank as it is passed from page to page.

This is an area that once upon a time was the key to ranking highly in the Search Engines results.  These days, the on-site work still needs to be done to maximize results but it is all that happens off of your site that is most important to the Search Engines.

Search Engine Marketing or SEM is the collection of tactics and efforts that take place off of your site for the purpose of increasing a page’s standing in the Search Engine results.  This can be made up of many activities but at the root of it all is linking.

In the evolution of SEM there was a time when simply having the most links pointing to a page got you the results you wanted.  It didn’t matter from where those links came as long as there were lots of them.  That can still be true to some extent today but the game has changed.

There are many factors that a Search Engine considers (at least the ones we are aware of) when determining its "opinion" of what a link does for your page.  These factors include:

  • The age of the domain from where the link is coming
  • The relevance of the page content from where the link is coming
  • The relevance of the link anchor text
  • The page rank of the linking page
  • The overall "quality" (a nice subjective view) of the linking page
  •  And a number of other factors

 Taking all of that into consideration the impact of fewer, high-power links as opposed to a ton of lower quality links would start to explain how some pages with seemingly low link counts (relative to the other ranking pages around them, are able to make it onto the first page of the SERP’s.

 Logic says then that website owners would serve themselves well to put their efforts into securing links from high PR, well respected sites (which can take some serious work) as opposed to going the easier route which is the acquisition of tons of lower quality links.

This leads to one more issue…

What the client expects.

I purpose that we as SEO practitioners and consultants owe it to our clients to explain the situation and shift their focus away from expecting to see a rapidly growing number of links over time to seeing instead the results they desire — top ten placement for their target search terms.

What’s your take on this?

Filed under Blog, General Musings, Online Marketing, SEO by  #

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